The Dream of the Rood

A new translation and adaptation by Colin Symes

'The Dream of the Rood'' sat for years unread upon the bookshelf in my study. I had been given it by a well-meaning friend, who was acquainted with my love of language, and who had been clearing out their own library, and decided it might be of interest to me.

Looking at the Anglo-Saxon text, obscured at times by a pencilled gloss of tiny English words, looking rather like lred's Old English superscript above the Latin of the pages of the Lindisfarne Gospels, I decided that this was well beyond me. I had no idea of its content, nor of its significance in the history of English sacred poetry.

<< The Ruthwell Cross, Dumfries and Galloway

 

In February 2003, I decided to take the advice of Lord Alton, printed in the Telegraph's article on recommended Lenten reading , to explore the life and character of J R R Tolkien, author of The Lord of the Rings, which has enjoyed such popular acclaim in these last few years. I borrowed from the local library Humphrey Carpenter's biography of Tolkien, and began to read.

Carpenter recalls that when Tolkien discovered Old English, he had the sensation that here was a language he already knew deep down. This natural feel for the ancient Anglian speech led on to his becoming eventually Rawlingson Professor of Ango-Saxon at Oxford University.

My imagination was fired by this idea that one could feel an innate connection with a dead language; I borrowed from the library Sweet's Anglo-Saxon primer, and having scanned a few of the basic rules, began to read the passages given for practice. I was thrilled with the readings from the gospels in particular, and with the extract from 'The Battle of Maldon', an ancient conflict which took place in a place I knew well as a child, from summer days out at that lovely town on the River Blackwater.

Still, the 'Dream of the Rood' stayed on my bookshelf, until some notion came to me that I still had it among my dusty collection, and so I picked it up.

It was as though the book caught fire in my hands; suddenly, it made sense, and as I read the words, sounding the broad, ancient vowels , I became inspired by it. I pressed on, beyond where the erstwhile owner's gloss finished above the printed words, and began to work on the meaning for myself. I wept over it, I worshipped with it; I began to commit parts of it to memory. And then I knew it had to be unlocked somehow for this generation, this age that loves Tolkien and his epic style, that is rediscovering Celtic spirituality and its later Northumbrian offshoots.

I read of the ancient Vercelli book, the main manuscript of the Dream, kept still in that city in Italy; I then read of the amazing link between the poem and the Ruthwell stone cross, preserved in the church building of that Dumfriesshire village, and of the runes on its facings, in which are carved phrases from the poem.

Things began to make sense. Here was a work, probably of Northumbrian origin, linked to the great flowering of the cult of veneration of the rood (the ancient word for the cross) which happened here in the eighth century. The poem expressed in heroic terms, appealing to the warrior culture of the time, the ultimate victory Christ won at the cross, with the promise of heaven to come for those who take the rood for their protection. It may even have been framed in the school of Cdmon, whose hymn is perhaps the first of all English hymns ever written, the cowherd turned worshipper whose charism of song lit up the Northumbrian church.

And now this poem is presented here, in a form accessible to modern English readers. In its adaptation, I have sought not to be enslaved by the individual words of the text, but have sought to keep above all the style and flow of the Old English poetry. Where possible, I have sought to keep as close to the original sounds as I could, which some may feel results in too much use of archaic forms. However, part of the joy of the Dream of the Rood is its earthily pre-Norman, pre-Latinate word sound, and this I have sought to preserve where I could. (Thus, words such as bairn for child, still in common usage in the Scots English offspring of Anglo-Saxon , and rood itself, meaning cross, still found in Ecclesiastical terms such as rood-screen, and place names such as Holyrood, are employed where they help the reader to connect with the original.)

 I hope this work brings alive for you the spirit of the era of the first preaching of the Good News (the Godspel) of Jesus Christ in these islands, and of men and women captivated by the prospect of friendship with God, and of life in bliss to come beyond the all-too inevitable grave.

 BBC Video Clip about the Ruthwell Cross

Clip from The Dream of the Rood in Old English (mp3) lines 39 to 50 of the poem, found in fragmented form in the Ruthwell Cross runes

 

The Dream of the Rood

translated and adapted from the Old English original

 

Lo ! I will recount the choicest dream

I dreamed amid the deep of night,
When speech-bearers were at their rest.

Bethought me that I saw a wondrous tree,
Lifted aloft, light bewreathing Brightest boughs.

All that beacon was
Bedecked with gold; gems glittering, it stood,
Fair upon earth's face; five of them there were
Upon the axis-span. There beheld God's angels all,
Fair of their fore-making. Nor was that any felon's gallows, 10
But rather, hallowed spirits beheld it there,

Men earthly, mortal, with all creation's marvels .

Splendid was that saving tree, but I, foul with sin,
Wounded sore with woe, I saw the wondrous tree,
Winsome, shining, wearing a worthy covering,

Begirt with gold; gems now
Weighed worthily upon the Ruler's tree.
Yet through that gold I still could glimpse
The erstwhile agony, as it first began
To sweat blood from its right-hand side. Full of sore distress, 20
I feared before that fair vision. I saw that fateful sign
Change covering and color; where it had been wet and damp,

Steeped in a stream of blood, now in such wealth arrayed.

While I was yet a long time lying there,
Heart-sorrowed, I beheld the healing tree,
And then I heard that it addressed me;
This best of wood began to speak with words:

"It was years ago (I still remember well)
That I was hewn down at the holt's edge,
Stripped from my stock. Strong foemen took me thence; 30
Working me into a warning-sign - they meant to have me raise up their rogues.
Borne on broad man-shoulders, 'til they set me on a hill-brow,
Many foemen fastened me there. The Lord of mankind then I saw
Hastening with great desire that he should climb upon me.

There, then, I durst not at the dear Lord's word
Bow nor break, e'en when I beheld the quaking
Face
of earth. Well might I have felled
All his foemen, but rather I stood fast.
The young hero undressed himself, (this was God almighty)
Strong and steadfast ; he stepped up on the high gallows, 40
Mighty, in full sight of many, for he would loose mankind.

I trembled as the Warrior embraced me; yet did not dare to buckle ground-ward,
To fall upon the face of earth, but as I should, stood fast.
I was raised up a rood; I lifted up the bless'd realm's King,
High Lord of heaven, I durst not fail Him.
They drove me through with dark and evil nails:

Upon me still the doleful wounds are seen,
Open wounds of malice; nor durst I any of them injure.

They mocked us both together; I was all steeped in blood,
Poured from that human side, after he sent forth his spirit. 50
Fully had I endured upon that hill
A fearful fate. I saw the God of hosts
Ruthlessly racked. The gloom had
Covered in cloud the High King's corpse,
That shimmering star; a shadow went forth ,
Dark under the sky. All creatures wept,
Crying at the king's fall; Christ was on cross.


But then came faithful ones from far
To that Prince's side. I beheld it all.
Though sore was I, and sorrow-afflicted, 60

Yet I submitted to the warriors' hands,
Humbled most willingly. They took from me Almighty God,
Hove him from that heavy torture. The warriors left me then
Standing, drenched and streaming, wounded still with piercings .
Laid they there that limb-weary one, then stood at his lifeless head,
Beholding there the Lord of heaven, and resting there awhile,
Grim after that great battle. Began they then to make a grave for him,
These brave ones, in full sight of his bane; carved of bright stone;
They laid therein their Lord and Victor. Began they then to make lament, Eerie on the eventide, ere they departed after, 70
Wearied, from this wondrous prince; rested he there with the few.

Yet we remained a-weeping a good while
Still standing at our stations, after the departure
Of the Warriors. The body cooled,
Fair life-dwelling , then they began to fell us
All to earth. That was a fearful fate!
They dug us a deep pit and buried us. Yet there the Lord's servants,
His friends, found me,
And adorned me with gold and silver.

Now you may hear, O my beloved hero, 80
That I have suffered evil-doers' works ,
And sore sorrows. The season is now come
When far and wide I am called worthy;
Men earthly, mortal, and all creation's marvels,
Beseech this bright beacon. For upon me God's bairn
Suffered at that time; therefore I am now gloriously
Raised high to the heavens, and may heal
Each and all who shall be in awe of me.

Once was I made the worst of torments,
By folk most feared, ere I life's way 90
Of righteousess revealed to speech-bearers.
Lo, then was I honoured by the Prince of Glory

Above all holm and wood, by Heaven's Guardian !

Just as he too his mother, Mary , Almighty God

for all men Made worthy above all womankind.

Now would I have you, my beloved young hero,
Tell this vision unto many men,
Unwrap these words; this is the wondrous cross
On which Almighty God once suffered 100
For mankind's manifold sins

And Adam's ancient work.

Death He tasted there, but the Lord arose
In his mighty might as mankind's helper,
Then stepped into the heavens. Hither coming again

To this middle-earth , mankind seeking
On Doomsday, the dear Lord himself ,

Almighty God, his angels with Him,
Then will judge, with his judgement's power

Each one, as he shall hereto 100
In this fleeting life have earned himself.
Nor may any there be unafraid
Of the word which the wise Lord speaks:
He will ask before many where might the man be,
That for the Lord's name would
Taste bitter death, as he did first upon that tree.
But they then fearing, will little think
What they could begin to say to Christ.

Yet there then need not any be afeared
Who ere bears in his breast this best of signs, 120
For through this rood shall reach his realm

From the earthly way, each and every soul

That with the Lord desires to dwell."

I beseeched then at that rood-beam with blithe heart,
With great zeal, while I was alone,
Away from crowds; my mind was
Focused on its forward path, fully enduring all
Its times of longing. My life's hope now is
That I might seek out this victory-tree
Alone, more often than all other men - 130
It is well worthy. My will in this is
Much in mind, and my mainstay is
Rigged upon that rood. I have not many rich
Friends on earth; for they hence forth
Have quit the world's delights, seeking for that wondrous King.

Living now in heaven with their High Father,
They dwell in glory; and I look for
That day when the Lord's cross,
Which here on earth I once was shown,
From this fleeting life might fetch me 140
And then bring me where there is much joy ,
Delight in heaven, where the Lord's folk are
Seated at the feast, where there is single bliss,
That I might then be sat where afterwards I may
Dwell in glory, as well of those holy
Delights partaking. Be to me, O Lord, a friend,
Who here on earth once did suffer
On that gallows-tree for human sin ,
Unloosing us to give us back our life,
And heavenly home. Hope was renewed 150
With blessedness and bliss for them who otherwise should burn.

The Son's victory secure, he then set out,
Mighty and swift, as he came with many,

A company of souls, to God's own realm,
Almighty Overlord, to angels in their bliss,
And to all those holy ones who now in heaven
Dwelt in its wonders, as their liege-Lord came,

Almighty God, to where his homeland was.

 

Colin Symes, Edinburgh 28 Dec 2003

Now follows the Interlinear translation with the original Anglo-Saxon version

Modern English lines in bold type

Original Anglo-Saxon in plain italics

Lines carved in runes on the Ruthwell Cross in plain type

Lo ! I will recount the choicest dream,
Hwt! Ic swefna cyst secgan wylle,
I dreamed amid the deep of night,
hwt me gemtte to midre nihte,
when speech-bearers were at their rest.
syan reordberend reste wunedon!
Bethought me that I saw a wondrous tree,
uhte me t ic gesawe syllicre treow
Lifted aloft, light bewreathing

on lyft ldan, leohte bewunden,
Brightest boughs. All that beacon was
beama beorhtost. Eall t beacen ws
bedecked with gold; gems glittering, it stood,
begoten
mid golde. Gimmas stodon
Fair upon earth's face; five of them there were
fgere t foldan sceatum, swylce r fife wron
upon the axis-span. There beheld God's angels all,
uppe on am eaxlegespanne. Beheoldon r engel dryhtnes ealle,
fair of their fore-making. Nor was that any felon's gallows,
fgere urh forgesceaft. Ne ws r huru fracodes gealga,
but rather, hallowed spirits beheld it there,

ac hine r beheoldon halige gastas,
Men earthly, mortal, with all created marvels .
men ofer moldan, ond eall eos mre gesceaft.
Splendid was that saving tree, but I, foul with sin,
Syllic ws se sigebeam, ond ic synnum fah,
wounded sore with woe, I saw the wondrous tree
forwunded mid wommum. Geseah ic wuldres treow,
Winsome
, shining, wearing a worthy covering,

wdum geweorode, wynnum scinan,
begirt with gold; gems now
gegyred mid golde; gimmas hfdon
weighed worthily upon the Ruler's tree.
bewrigene weorlice wealdendes treow.
Yet through that gold I still could glimpse
Hwre ic urh t gold ongytan meahte
the erstwhile agony, as it first began
earmra rgewin, t hit rest ongan
To sweat blood from its right-hand side. Full of sore distress,
swtan on a swiran healfe.
Eall ic ws mid sorgum gedrefed,
I feared before that fair vision. I saw that fateful sign
forht ic ws for re fgran gesyhe. Geseah ic t fuse beacen
change covering and color; where it had been wet and damp,

wendan wdum ond bleom; hwilum hit ws mid wtan bestemed,
steeped in a stream of blood, now in such wealth arrayed.
beswyled mid swates gange, hwilum mid since gegyrwed.
While I was yet a long time lying there,
Hwre ic r licgende lange hwile
heart-sorrowed, I beheld the healing tree,
beheold hreowcearig hlendes treow,
and then I heard that it addressed me;
ot ic gehyrde t hit hleorode.
This best of wood began to speak with words:
Ongan a word sprecan wudu selesta:

"That was years ago (I still remember well)
"t ws geara iu, (ic t gyta geman),
that I was hewn down at the holt's edge,
t ic ws aheawen holtes on ende,
stripped from my stock. Strong foemen took me thence;
astyred of stefne minum. Genaman me r strange feondas,
working me into a warning-sign - they meant to have me raise up their rogues.
geworhton him r to wfersyne, heton me heora wergas hebban.
Borne on broad man-shoulders, 'til they set me on a hill- brow,
Bron me r beornas on eaxlum, ot hie me on beorg asetton,
many foemen fastened me there. The Lord of mankind then I saw
gefstnodon me r feondas genoge. Geseah ic a frean mancynnes
hastening in great desire that he might climb upon me.
efstan elne mycle t he me wolde on gestigan.
35 There then I durst not at the dear Lord's word
r ic a ne dorste ofer dryhtnes word
bow nor break, e'en when I beheld the quaking
bugan oe berstan, a ic bifian geseah
face of earth. Well might I have felled
eoran sceatas. Ealle ic mihte
all his foemen, but rather I stood fast.
feondas gefyllan, hwre ic fste stod.
The young hero undressed himself, (this was God almighty)
Ongyrede hine a geong hle, (t ws god lmihtig),
+ Ondgered Hin . . . . .God Alme3ttig.
40 strong and steadfast ; he stepped up on the high gallows,
strang ond stimod. Gestah he on gealgan heanne,
a He walde on galgu gistiga
mighty, in full sight of many, for he would loose mankind.

modig on manigra gesyhe, a he wolde mancyn lysan.
modig fore all men
I trembled as the Warrior embraced me; yet did not dare to buckle ground-ward,
Bifode ic a me se beorn ymbclypte. Ne dorste ic hwre bugan to eoran,
buga ic ni dorst
to fall upon the face of earth, but as I should, stood fast.
feallan to foldan sceatum, ac ic sceolde fste standan.
ac scealde fst standa.
I was raised up a rood; I lifted up the bless'd realm's King,
Rod ws ic arred. Ahof ic ricne cyning,
Ahof ic riicn Kyninc.
45 High Lord of heaven, I durst not fail Him.
heofona hlaford, hyldan me ne dorste.
Heafuns Hlaford hlda ic ni dors.
They drove me through with dark and evil nails: upon me still the doleful wounds are seen,
urhdrifan hi me mid deorcan nglum. On me syndon a dolg gesiene,
open wounds of malice.
Nor durst I any of them injure.
opene inwidhlemmas. Ne dorste ic hira nnigum scean.
They mocked us both together. I was all steeped in blood,
Bysmeredon hie unc butu tgdere. Eall ic ws mid blode bestemed,
Bismradu unket men ba tgadre; ic ws mi blodi bistemid,
poured from that human side, after he sent forth his spirit.
begoten of s guman sidan, sian he hfde his gast onsended.
bigoten of s Guman sida sian He His gast send.
50 Fully had I endured upon that hill
Feala ic on am beorge gebiden hbbe
a fearful fate. I saw the God of hosts
wrara wyrda. Geseah ic weruda god
ruthlessly racked. The gloom had
earle enian. ystro hfdon
covered in cloud the High King's corpse,
bewrigen mid wolcnum wealdendes hrw,
that shimmering star, a shadow went forth ,
scirne sciman, sceadu foreode,
55 dark under the sky. All creatures wept,
wann
under wolcnum. Weop eal gesceaft,
crying at the king's fall; Christ was on cross.
cwidon cyninges fyll. Crist ws on rode.
+ Krist ws on rodi.

But then came faithful ones from far
Hwere r fuse feorran cwoman
Hwer er fus fearran kwomu
to that Prince's side. I beheld it all.
to am elinge. Ic t eall beheold.
il til anum: ic t al biheald.
Though sore was I, and sorrow-afflicted, yet I submitted to the warriors' hands,
Sare ic ws mid sorgum gedrefed, hnag ic hwre am secgum to handa,
Sar ic ws mi sorgum gidrfid; hnag ic am secgum til handa.
60 humbled most willingly. They took from me almighty God,
eamod elne mycle. Genamon hie r lmihtigne god,
hove him from that heavy torture. The warriors left me then
ahofon hine of am hefian wite. Forleton me a hilderincas
standing, drenched and streaming, wounded still with piercings .
standan steame bedrifenne; eall ic ws mid strlum forwundod.
Mi strelum giwundad
Laid they there that limb-weary one, then stood at his lifeless head;
Aledon hie r limwerigne, gestodon him t his lices heafdum,
alegdun hi Hin limwrign; gistoddun him t His lics heafdum;
beholding there the Lord of heaven, and resting there awhile,
beheoldon hie r heofenes dryhten, ond he hine r hwile reste,
bihealdun hi er Heafuns Dryctin; ond He Hin er hwil rest.
65 grim after that great battle. Began they then a grave to make for him,
mee
fter am miclan gewinne. Ongunnon him a moldern wyrcan
these brave ones, in full sight of his bane; carved of bright stone,
beornas on banan gesyhe; curfon hie t of beorhtan stane,

they laid therein their Lord and Victor. Began they then to make lament,

gesetton hie ron sigora wealdend. Ongunnon him a sorhleo galan
eerie on the eventide, ere they departed after,
earme on a fentide, a hie woldon eft siian,
wearied, from this wondrous prince; rested he there with the few.
mee fram am mran eodne. Reste he r mte weorode.
70 Yet we remained a-weeping a good while
Hwere we r greotende gode hwile
Still standing at our stations, after the departure
stodon on staole, syan stefn up gewat
of the Warriors. The body cooled,
hilderinca
. Hrw colode,
fair life-dwelling , then they began to fell us
fger feorgbold. a us man fyllan ongan
all to earth. That was a fearful fate!
ealle to eoran. t ws egeslic wyrd!
75 They dug us a deep pit and buried us. Yet there the Lord's servants,
Bedealf us man on deopan seae. Hwre me r dryhtnes egnas,
His friends, found me,
freondas gefrunon,
and adorned me with gold and silver.
ond gyredon me golde ond seolfre.

"Now you may hear, O my beloved hero,
Nu u miht gehyran, hle min se leofa,
that I have suffered evil-doers' works ,
t ic bealuwara weorc gebiden hbbe,
80 and sore sorrows. The season is now come
sarra sorga. Is nu sl cumen
when far and wide I am called worthy
t me weoria wide ond side
men earthly, mortal, and all creation's marvels,
menn ofer moldan, ond eall eos mre gesceaft,
beseech this bright beacon. For upon me God's bairn
gebidda him to yssum beacne.
On me bearn godes
suffered at that time; therefore I am now gloriously
rowode hwile. Foran ic rymfst nu
85
raised high to the heavens, and may heal
hlifige under heofenum, ond ic hlan mg
each and all who shall be in awe of me.
ghwylcne anra, ara e him bi egesa to me.
Once was I made the worst of torments,
Iu ic ws geworden wita heardost,
by folk most feared, ere I life's way
leodum laost, ran ic him lifes weg
of righteousess revealed to speech-bearers.
rihtne gerymde, reordberendum.
90 Lo, then was I honoured by the Prince of Glory, Hwt, me a geweorode wuldres ealdor
above all holm and wood, by Heaven's Guardian ! ofer holmwudu, heofonrices weard!
Just as he too his mother Mary ,

Swylce swa he his modor eac, Marian sylfe,
Almighty God, for all men

lmihtig god for ealle menn
made her worthy above all womankind.
geweorode ofer eall wifa cynn.

95 "Now would I have you, my beloved young hero,
Nu ic e hate, hle min se leofa,
Tell this vision unto many men
t u as gesyhe secge mannum,
unwrap these words; this is the wondrous cross
onwreoh wordum t hit is wuldres beam,
on which almighty God once suffered
se e lmihtig god on rowode
for mankind's manifold sins for mancynnes manegum synnum
100 and Adam's ancient work. ond Adomes ealdgewyrhtum.
Death He tasted there, but the Lord arose
Dea he r byrigde, hwere eft dryhten aras
in his mighty might as mankind's helper .
mid his miclan mihte mannum to helpe.
Then stepped into the heavens. Hither coming again

He a on heofenas astag. Hider eft funda
to this middle-earth , mankind seeking,
on ysne middangeard mancynn secan
105 on doomsday the dear Lord himself ,

on domdge dryhten sylfa,
almighty God, his angels with Him,
lmihtig god, ond his englas mid,
then will judge, with his judgement's power

t he onne wile deman, se ah domes geweald,
each one as he shall hereto
anra gehwylcum swa he him rur her
in this fleeting life have earned himself.
on yssum lnum life geearna.
110 Nor may any there be unafraid
Ne mg r nig unforht wesan
of the word which the wise Lord speaks:
for am worde e se wealdend cwy.
He will ask before many where might the man be,
Frine he for re mnige hwr se man sie,
that for the Lord's name would
se e for dryhtnes naman deaes wolde
taste bitter death, as he did first upon that tree.
biteres onbyrigan, swa he r on am beame dyde.
115 But they then fearing, will little think
Ac hie onne forhtia, ond fea enca
what they could begin to say to Christ.
hwt hie to Criste cwean onginnen.
Yet there need not then any be afeared
Ne earf r onne nig anforht wesan
who ere bears in his breast this best of signs,
e him r in breostum bere beacna selest,
For through this rood shall reach his realm

ac urh a rode sceal rice gesecan
120 from the earthly way, each and every soul

of eorwege ghwylc sawl,
that with the Lord desires to dwell."

seo e mid wealdende wunian ence."

I beseeched then at that rood-beam with a blithe heart,
Gebd ic me a to an beame blie mode,
with great zeal, while I was alone
elne mycle, r ic ana ws

away from crowds; my mind was
mte werede. Ws modsefa
125 focused on its forward path, fully enduring all
afysed on forwege, feala ealra gebad
its times of longing. My life's hope now is

langunghwila. Is me nu lifes hyht
that I might seek out this victory-tree
t ic one sigebeam secan mote
alone, more often than all other men -

ana oftor onne ealle men,
it is well worthy. My will in this is
well weorian. Me is willa to am
130 much in mind, and my mainstay is
mycel on mode, ond min mundbyrd is
rigged upon that rood. I have not many rich
geriht to re rode. Nah ic ricra feala
friends on earth; for they hence forth
freonda on foldan, ac hie for heonon
have quit the world's delights, seeking for that wondrous King ,

gewiton of worulde dreamum, sohton him wuldres cyning,
living now in heaven with that High Father,
lifia nu on heofenum mid heahfdere,
135 they dwell in glory; and I look for
wunia on wuldre, ond ic wene me
that day when the Lord's cross,
daga gehwylce hwnne me dryhtnes rod,
which here on earth I once was shown,
e ic her on eoran r sceawode,
From this fleeting life might fetch me
on ysson lnan life gefetige
and then bring me where there is much joy ,
ond me onne gebringe r is blis mycel,
140 Delight in heaven, where the Lord's folk are
dream on heofonum, r is dryhtnes folc
seated at the feast, where there is single bliss,
geseted to symle, r is singal blis,
that I might then be sat where afterwards I may
ond me onne asette r ic syan mot
dwell in glory, as well of those holy
wunian on wuldre, well mid am halgum
delights partaking. Be to me, O Lord, a friend,
dreames brucan. Si me dryhten freond,
145 who here on earth once did suffer
se e her on eoran r rowode
on that gallows-tree for human sin ,
on am gealgtreowe for guman synnum.
Unloosing us to give us back our life,
He us onlysde ond us lif forgeaf,
and heavenly home. Hope was renewed
heofonlicne ham. Hiht ws geniwad
with blessedness and bliss for them who otherwise should burn.

mid bledum ond mid blisse am e r bryne olodan.
150 The Son's victory secure, he then set out,
Se sunu ws sigorfst on am sifate,
mighty and swift, as he came with many,

mihtig ond spedig, a he mid manigeo com,
a company of souls, to God's own realm,
gasta weorode, on godes rice,

Almighty Overlord, to angels in their bliss,
anwealda lmihtig, englum to blisse
and to all those holy ones who now in heaven
ond eallum am halgum am e on heofonum r
155 dwelt in its wonders, as their liege-Lord came,
wunedon on wuldre, a heora wealdend cwom,
Almighty God, to where his homeland was.
lmihtig god, r his eel ws.